Controlling organ growth with light

In optogenetics, researchers use light to control protein activity. This technique allows them to alter the shape of embryonic tissue and to inhibit the development of abnormalities. Now, scientists in EMBL's De Renzis…

Channels for the supply of energy

Working in cooperation with international colleagues, researchers from the University of Freiburg have described how water-insoluble membrane proteins are transported through the aqueous space between the mitochondrial…

3D chemical maps of single bacteria

Scientists at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) -- a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory -- have used ultrabright x-rays to image…

Jose Mourinho watches Belgium beat Iceland

Jose Mourinho was in Brussels on Thursday night on a scouting mission as he watched Belgium beat Iceland.Roberto Martinez's side were comfortable 2-0 winners at the King Baudouin Stadium, but did so without either of…

Drop your weapons!

Animal weapons such as antlers, tusks and limbs specialized for fighting require a large energy expenditure to produce and may cost even more to maintain. Because the leaf-footed bug sheds its large hind limbs, used as…

Solar panels for yeast cell biofactories

Genetically engineered microbes such as bacteria and yeasts have long been used as living factories to produce drugs and fine chemicals. More recently, researchers have started to combine bacteria with semiconductor…

Why we shouldn’t like coffee, but we do

Why do we like the bitter taste of coffee? Bitterness evolved as a natural warning system to protect the body from harmful substances. By evolutionary logic, we should want to spit it out. But, it turns out, the more…

Natural solutions can reduce global warming

Restoring the United States' lands and coastal wetlands could have a much bigger role in reducing global warming than previously thought, according to the most comprehensive national assessment to date of how greenhouse…

Symbiosis a driver of truffle diversity

While the sight of black or white truffle being shaved over on pasta is generally considered a sign of dining extravagance, they play an important role in soil ecosystem services. Truffles are the fruiting bodies of the…

Carbon goes with the flow

Many people see the carbon cycle as vertical -- CO2 moving up and down between soil, plants and the atmosphere. However, new Michigan State University research published in the current issue of Geophysical Research…

‘Rare’ jellyfish not so rare

When the Rhizostoma luteum jellyfish was discovered at the beginning of the 19th century in the waters of the Strait of Gibraltar, only nine specimens were identified. For years, it was so inconspicuous that later, in…

Moths and magnets could save lives

A new technology that relies on a moth-infecting virus and nanomagnets could be used to edit defective genes that give rise to diseases like sickle cell, muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis. Rice University…

Nitrogen fixation in ambient conditions

Abundant in nature (78% of the air we breathe), nitrogen is rarely used in the industrial production of chemicals, with the most important process being the synthesis of ammonia, which is in turn used for the preparation…

London homicides

As homicides in London surpass the total for last year, here is a list of all victims of murder or manslaughter in 2018.

The new face of South American people

The history of the peopling of the Americas has just been interpreted afresh. The largest and most comprehensive study ever conducted on the basis of fossil DNA extracted from ancient human remains found on the continent…

Making wind farms more efficient

With energy demands rising, researchers at Penn State Behrend and the University of Tabriz, Iran, have completed an algorithm -- or approach -- to design more efficient wind farms, helping to generate more revenue for…

How much debris is lying on glaciers?

A warming Earth causes the volume of mountain glaciers and their extent to decline globally for decades. At the same time, the cover of many glaciers with debris changes. However, this debris coverage has been rarely…

Freshwater turtles navigate using the sun

Blanding's turtle hatchlings need only the sun as their compass to guide them on their way to the nearest wetland -- and a place of safety. This is according to John Dean Krenz of Minnesota State University in the US,…

A toast to the proteins in dinosaur bones

Burnt toast and dinosaur bones have a common trait, according to a new, Yale-led study. They both contain chemicals that, under the right conditions, transform original proteins into something new. It's a process that…

Healing kidneys with nanotechnology

Each year, there are some 13.3 million new cases of acute kidney injury (AKI), a serious affliction. Formerly known as acute renal failure, the ailment produces a rapid buildup of nitrogenous wastes and decreases urine…

Bees on the brink

For bees, being social is everything. Whether it's foraging for food, caring for the young, using their bodies to generate heat or to fan the nest, or building and repairing nests, a bee colony does just about everything…

Unique study shows how bats maneuver

For the first time, researchers have succeeded in directly measuring the aerodynamics of flying animals as they manoeuvre in the air. Previously, the upstroke of the wings was considered relatively insignificant compared…

How do babies laugh? Like chimps!

Few things can delight an adult more easily than the uninhibited, effervescent laughter of a baby. Yet baby laughter, a new study shows, differs from adult laughter in a key way: Babies laugh as they both exhale and…